British chip designer Arm on Monday launched several new products to enhance premium smartphone performance across gaming and AI.

The Cortex-X4 CPU is designed for ultimate performance and represents yet another generation of double-digit IPC growth, with 15 percent performance improvements compared to last year’s Android flagship.

“Alongside performance, Cortex-X4 is the most efficient Cortex-X CPU core ever built, with 40 percent better power efficiency,” said the company at the ‘Computex’ event in Taiwan.

The new chip comes with a focus on enabling artificial intelligence and machine learning-based apps.

The company also announced Arm Total Compute Solutions 2023 (TCS23), which will be the platform for mobile computing, offering “our best ever premium solution for smartphones”.

TCS23 delivers a complete package of the latest IP designed and optimized for specific workloads to work seamlessly together as a complete system.

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“The premium TCS23 is designed for ultimate performance and compute-intensive experiences that are commonly required for premium and flagship smartphones and laptops,” said the company.

It pushes system-wide performance and efficiency improvements for the very best visual experiences, such as immersive, smooth AAA mobile gaming experiences, advanced AI use cases like image and video enhancement, and device multi-tasking.

The company unveiled ‘Arm Immortalis-G720’, which is based on its fifth-generation GPU architecture. The 5G GPU architecture has been created with high geometry games and real-time 3D apps in mind.

“Mobile devices touch every aspect of our digital lives. In the palm of your hand is the ability to both create and consume increasingly immersive, AI-accelerated experiences that continue to drive the need for more compute. Arm is at the heart of many of these, bringing unlimited delight, productivity and success to more people than ever,” said Chris Bergey, senior vice president and general manager, Client Line of Business, Arm.

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